Virginia Center for Civil War Studies

Previous research grant recipients

2015-2016

Rebecca Adams, a PhD student at George Mason University. Her research explored romance, courtship, and marriage rituals in the lives of southern women.

Wendy Gonaver, who conducted research for a book entitled The Peculiar Institution: Race, Gender, and Religion in the Making of Modern Psychiatry.

Charles Irons, associate professor of history at Elon University. He studied black southerners’ withdrawal from white-controlled churches during and after the Civil War.

Eric Meckley, a PhD student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research examined literary depictions of the Civil War from the start of the war to World War I.

Seth Nichols, an MA Student at Marshall University. He conducted research for a thesis that looks at how returning Union and Confederate soldiers shaped the legacy and meaning of the Civil War in West Virginia.

 

2014-2015

Jack Furniss, a PhD student at the University of Virginia. Looking at six key states – New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, California, and Massachusetts – he explored the role that state governors played in articulating the political messages, and building the electoral coalitions, that kept the Union war effort going.

Jesse George-Nichol, a PhD student at the University of Virginia. Her dissertation project revisits the state secession conventions to ask why the Upper South states of Virginia, Tennessee and North Carolina ultimately seceded from the Union and joined the Confederacy while other slave states in the Upper South, like Kentucky, did not.

Tim Williams, author of Intellectual Manhood: University, Self, and Society in the Antebellum South, who teaches at the Robert D. Clark Honor’s College, University of Oregon. During his time in Virginia Tech’s Special Collections, he researched the reading habits of Confederate prisoners of war.

Michael Woods, assistant professor of history at Marshall University. He researched the origins, development, and effects of the Emancipation Proclamation, paying special attention to the place of West Virginia – then in the process of statehood – in the broader story